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In this episode Royal Stoke’s doctors face exceptionally challenging cases: Joanna, a mother-of-one suffers a ruptured brain aneurism leaving Dr Sanjeev Nayak just minutes to attempt to stop the bleeding.

Meanwhile, a 17-year-old girl is critically injured in a car crash – her parents race to her side while trauma team leader Dr Richard Hall works to identify her injuries and get her to emergency surgery.

And in resus, a patient’s heart stops multiple times while Dr Hari Mandava battles to save his life. 

This unflinching episode of 999 Critical Condition delivers an intimate portrait of life-saving medicine through the eyes of those who live it – the staff and the patients.

Patient Stories

Series 2 introduced us to a whole host of incredible patient stories. Here is just one of them​...

A 41-year-old single mum is looking forward to living her life and spending quality time with her son after receiving life-saving care at University Hospitals of North Midlands.

Joanna Watts was admitted to the major trauma centre at Royal Stoke University Hospital with a brain aneurysm  or bleed on the brain and her case will be featured on the second episode of UHNMs exclusive documentary on Channel 5 999 Critical Condition on Thursday (31 Sept) at 9pm.

UHNM has been at the forefront of pioneering mechanical thrombectomy treatment and was the first in the UK to offer a 24/7 service.

Joanna suffered from extreme pain while in bed at home and called an ambulance. After initial assessment at her local hospital in Crewe she was transferred to the specialist stroke services available at University Hospital of Royal Stoke.

Joanna said: “I have found the whole experience very surreal. It wasn’t until I left the hospital that it actually hit me what had happened but I was relieved I was taken to the right place. It wasn’t until I did some research after that I realised just how close to death I came and I have struggled a lot with that, especially as I am a single mum.”

She added: “I am quite an upbeat person but I have been very anxious but now I want to live for today and tomorrow and not for yesterday and spend quality time with my son who is now seven.”

Joanna was in hospital for two weeks and spent a week on critical care and was then transferred to a ward to continue her recovery.

“I am eternally grateful to everyone involved in my care. They saved my life at the end of the day. I am also grateful to the nurses in critical care who looked after me and washed my hair after my operation. It’s small things like this that helped me to start to feel more normal again,” Joanna said.

Thursday’s episode also includes a 17-year-old girl critically injured in a car crash in North Wales. Her parents race to her side while trauma team leader Dr Richard Hall works to identify her injuries and get her to emergency surgery.

And in resus, a patient’s heart stops multiple times while Dr Hari Mandava battles to save his life. 

This unflinching episode of 999 Critical Condition delivers an intimate portrait of life-saving medicine through the eyes of those who live it – the staff and the patients.

A motorbike enthusiast today said he was lucky to be alive after crashing his bike into a stone wall and being rushed to the University Hospitals of North Midlands’ major trauma centre.

David Boyce, 34, was travelling home when he crashed into the wall and ended up unconscious in a field. He was airlifted by air ambulance to the trauma centre at Royal Stoke University Hospital for specialist urgent treatment.

His case featured in the second episode of the new series of 999 Critical Condition on Channel 5 on Thursday night. The ground-breaking documentary featuring the clinical staff has received critical acclaim and follows in incredible detail the staff and patients as they confront the realities of emergency medicine.

David, of Wilmslow, said: “The crash happened just a couple of days after my birthday and I had treated myself to a new helmet as a birthday present so it had never been worn but I put it well and truly to the test.

“The doctors said that because it was a brand new helmet it gave me the best protections. Without a doubt I am lucky to be alive.”

In the episode Dr Chris Pickering, consultant in emergency medicine, explains his concerns about a potential head injury and internal bleeding but following a CT scan also acknowledged David was a “lucky boy!”

David, who has made good recovery, said: “I don’t remember anything about the accident or going in the helicopter but I do remember waking up in hospital and wondering why I was in Stoke.

 “It is only now that I understand why I was taken there and that I received the specialist care I needed because of my potential injuries.”

He said: “I have ridden a motorbike for almost 17 years and this was my first crash and no-one will let me get back on the bike although I think I would like to. If anything comes from my accident I would urge people who ride bikes to wear the right gear even if you’re just popping to the shops.”

Thursday’s episode also included a mother-of-one who suffered from a ruptured brain aneurism; a 17-year-old girl who is critically injured in a car crash and a patient’s heart stops multiple times.